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Gender

Corrégé et al. (2001) collected data on PMWS over a 1-year period on a French pig farm and found that castrated male pigs were more susceptible to PMWS than females (38% versus 29%). In this study, the prevalence of PMWS was estimated by evaluating all dead pigs, recording clinical signs, and by regularly weighing the pigs (15-day-intervals during the first two month). Rodríguez-Arrioja et al. (2002) followed 250 3-week-old piglets (121 females, 106 castrated male, and 23 intact males) from a PMWS-affected farm up to 28 weeks of age and observed a difference in mortality between males and females. Males appeared to be at a higher risk of dying and it was concluded that this was likely due to an effect of castration associated with secondary infections.

References:
Corrégé I, Pirouelle H, Gaudré D, LeTiran MH: La maladie de l’amaigrissement du porcelet (MAP): influence de différents paramètres zootechniques sur son incidence dans un élevage expérimental. Journ Rech Porcine Fr. 33:283-290, 2001

Rodríguez-Arrioja GM, Segalés J, Calsamiglia M, Resendes AR, Balasch M, Plana-Durán J, Casal J, Domingo M: Dynamics of porcine circovirus type 2 infection in a herd of pigs with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. Am J Vet Res. 63:354-357, 2002 

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